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'Spyro: Reignited' Trilogy

He's back, baby!

The 'Reignited' version.

At the end of 2018 a thousand childhood memories came rushing back to me when I heard the news: Spyro was coming back! The reignited trilogy was going to enable me to play the games I loved as a kid and I was so excited. I got the game for Christmas but only started playing it this last month and it’s safe to say that I am in LOVE.

Although many would agree that nothing will beat the original, because nostalgia can only go so far, I have to say that I am impressed by Spyro Reignited. I have never been a gamer girl, I can’t kill zombies or play FIFA, and I’m certainly no good at any of recent games such as Fortnite BUT Spyro is my thing. The original Spyro the Dragon was released to PlayStation in 1998, one year before I was born. However, the second two games Ripto’s Rage! and Year of the Dragon were released in 1999 and 2000. When I was growing up, I have a lot of memories of my mother playing the Spyro games and we would sit together, and I’d watch her play it for hours. Spyro eventually became a big part of my childhood, and I used to play the game until our PlayStation finally died.

While playing Reignited, it is nice to see how the creators decided to update Spyro and his friends, as well as focusing on upgrading music and gameplay while retaining a familiarity of the original games. The music alone makes me feel so nostalgic towards the old games that I never realised how much of an impact the games made on me. Despite this, I did a bit of digging and realised there are a lot of differences between the original and the reignited that I didn’t notice.

One of my favourite differences is Sparx. In the original, Sparx never had any limbs, but in Reignited, Sparx has limbs, and is actually a lot cuter. The one thing that makes me drawn to Spyro is that the characters all seem to have a level of cuteness to them, whereas most games nowadays doesn’t obtain that element. Another one of my favourite differences is the cutscenes and intro scenes across all games. In the original not much talking is done, it is all kept quite minimal. Yet, in Reignited the characters are given some personality. For example, during the intro of the original Ripto’s Rage! Hunter says: “You’re a dragon?” with a hint of fear but in Reignited he speaks with disbelief to which Spyro responds cockily: “You got a problem with that, pussycat?” Scenes like this add personality to the game and the characters themselves and, personally, I enjoy this more.

As a returning Spyro player, it’s a delight to see old faces with a new lick of paint and explore familiar worlds in their new Disney-style glory. Everything is brighter and buzzing with life. If you put down your controller for a while Spyro will lick his claws like a cat, or Sparx will fly up to your screen as if looking in on what you’re doing. The game has become even more kid-friendly, with its monsters not looking quite as scary as before, and so Spyro Reignited is bound to attract the attention of new generations.

It is a game I will go back to time and time again and, sure if I did even more digging, I would find lots of people complaining about the new reignited version, but I know it’s good enough for me! I hope that will come a time in my life where I get to share the joys of Spyro with my kids, just like my own mother did with me. 

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'Spyro: Reignited' Trilogy
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